Daisy Monograph

Common names: Common daisy, English daisy, Wild daisy, Bruisewort, Woundwort, Bairnwort

Latin name: Bellis perennis

Family name: Compositae (Asteraceae)

Genus: Carliquistia

Parts used: Flowers, Leaves, Root (less common)

Actions: Vulnerary, Anti-inflammatory, Astringent, Antioxidant, Expectorant, Cooling, Drying, Bitter

Constituents: Malic acid, acetic acid, oxalic acid, tartaric acid, L-ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), L-arbutin, resins, wax, inulin, mucilaginous substances, saponins, minerals, essential oils, and tannins.

Indications: Bruises, broken bones, muscle pain, wounds, rheumatism, upper respiratory infections, gastritis, stomach ache, headache, inflammation, diarrhea, bleeding, boils, common cold, and eczema. Because it is rich in antioxidants along with acids that firm the skin, daisy can be used to treat wrinkles and saggy skin. The L-arbutin in daisy can lighten the skin. It can also act as a vitamin supplement.

Preparation & Dosage: Young leaves can be eaten raw in salads, or cooked, though the leaves become increasingly astringent with age.ย Flower buds and petals can be eaten raw in sandwiches, soups, and salads. May be used in tea, infusion, or extract form. To make tea: Add 2 tsp of fresh daisies to 1 cup of boiled water. Infuse for 10 mins. For an infusion, add 1 Tb to 1 qt jar and steep 4 hrs to overnight. Strain off the herbs and drink the liquid.ย A strong decoction of the roots was used to treat scurvy. For skincare, Daisy can be infused in distilled water and used as a wash, or flower heads can be added directly to the bath to ease skin troubles. Daisy flowers can also be made into an infused oil and/or salve to treat skin, bruises, wounds, etc., Dosage: Tea and infusion up to 3 cups per day, Tincture/extract up to 20 drops, 3 x day.

Description: Low rosettes of small, oval, slightly hairy leaves with shallowly toothed edges, grows to 6-12 inches tall. White and yellow flower heads 2 1/2-5 centimeters, with hairy bracts under flower head, on short leafless stems. Fibrous rhizomes.

Habitat & Growing conditions: A perennial herbaceous plant that flowers from the earliest days of Spring till late Autumn and grows everywhere except Antarctica. Amazingly makes up almost 10% of all flowering plants on Earth! Full sun to partial shade. Grows wild and needs little care and maintenance. It may be propagated either by seed after the last frost or by division after flowering. Daisy is found mainly on moist, neutral to basic soils, in unimproved or improved grasslands kept short by grazing, mowing, or trampling. Also in disturbed habitats such as roadsides and waste ground. The flowers can be harvested from April to October.

Status: Considered a weed.

Cautions & considerations: Internally, it is best to use daisy with some supervision and support from an experienced herbalist. Do not use it internally during pregnancy or if one has digestive bleeding or irritation. Also, daisy flowers contain pollen and could trigger this allergy.

Magickal properties: Their magickal properties include love, friendship, divination, healing, and protection. Daisies are feminine in nature and resonate with Venus, the Sun, and the element of Water. The word daisy comes from โ€œdayโ€™s eye” because she closes up at night and opens up during the day, like a long-lashed eye. Daisy symbolizes innocence, purity, and childhood. A long-loved divinatory practice with daisies, is the infamous, “he loves me, he loves me not” while tearing the petals. In Norse mythology, the daisy is a sacred flower to Freya, but they make wonderful offerings for any Goddess and can be made into wreaths to wear in your hair for Beltane or Midsummer.

Flower Essence: Daisy flower essence can be great for students, writers, and other creatives, as it can help organize a scattered mind, and it can instill calmness and feelings of safety, protection, and love. Daisy FE can help align heart, mind, and consciousness, and open honest communication with self and others.

Notes: Daisy has a long history, since (2200 BC!) of medicinal use. Itโ€™s been said that the ancient Egyptians grew daisies in their gardens and utilized them medicinally.

During the Roman Empire, the military doctors soaked bandages with daisy flower tincture to treat wounded soldiers. T

Gerard mentions the Daisy, under the name of ‘Bruisewort,’ as an unfailing remedy in ‘all kinds of paines and aches,’ besides curing fevers, inflammation of the liver and ‘alle the inwarde parts.’

In 1771 Dr. Hill said that an infusion of the leaves was ‘excellent against Hectic Fevers.’ The Daisy was an ingredient of an ointment much used in the fourteenth century for wounds, gout, and fevers.

Resources:

Pic credit (&other notes) from A Modern Herbal (Botanical.com)

Solidarity Apothecary (solidarityapothecary.org)

The Herbal Hub (theherbalhub.com)

The Wildlife Journal (https://nhpbs.org/)

Beverly Hills MD (beverlyhillsmd.com)

Wicca Now (wiccanow.com)

The Tree Frog Farm (treefrogfarm.com)

Aquarius Flower Remedies (aquariusflowerremedies.com)

Wikepedia and Witchipedia

DIY Herbal Magic Spring Cleaning

Spring cleaning is a time-honored ritual. It may feel like a chore but if we practice intent while cleaning it can be a magical experience.โญ
Open the windows, burn some incense or a smoke/smudge stick to cleanse and circulate the air in your home.๐ŸŒ€
Then mix up some of these herbal blends to add a little magic!โœจ
These ingredients are also antibacterial, so not only will you be disinfecting and cleansing your home, but you can also focus on attracting protection, prosperity, and good health!๐Ÿ’š
Why use store-bought cleaners with harmful ingredients when you can easily make your own?
Happy Spring Cleaning!๐ŸŒน

My Gifted Garden Space

Grateful this summer a dear friend gave me the best gift ever…garden space! Living in an apartment I don’t have much room to garden and what I do have is pretty shaded from the large lovely Pines we have growing here. It fills me with joy to have the opportunity to develop my gardening skills, and to deepen my relationships with these sacred plants. I love spending time with them, giving them offerings, and talking to them, and it makes me so happy to please the bees, though I think I annoy them by trying to take their pictures, I back off when they tell me to!๐Ÿ˜๐ŸIn this post, I thought I’d share some pictures of my babies, like any proud mama!๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ’š

Pictured are St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum), Yarrow (Achillea millefolium), Lemon balm (Melissa Officinalis), Nettles (Urtica dioica), Greek mullein (Verbascum olympicum), Tulsi kapoor (Ocimum tenuiflorum), Calendula (Calendula officinalis), Valerian (Valeriana officinalis), Motherwort (Leonurus cardiac), and a row of kale and a row of pot marigold for pest repellent.

Sometimes you get a little sh*t with your roses!

Last month I had the opportunity to go wildcrafting with my teacher and friend, Jessica from Blackbird’s Daughter Botanicals. We headed to the ocean to gather wild roses (Rosa rugosa). I was really excited because I felt Rose had been gently calling for me to work with her.

Immediately I felt rose was teaching me boundaries. A needed lesson in my life. We had to drive to a few different locations to find any worth picking, it was raining down on us and when we finally found some, we had to harvest gently with awareness of the prickles. We had to work for her medicine, she wasn’t going to just give it away. I took this lesson into my heart.

We had a wonderful adventure and geeked out on the Botany of each plant, even the ones we found in the parking lot, and there were many!

While we were filming dog roses, I noticed a big pile of poo, stepping around it to film my teacher. I don’t know how I forgot it was there, but when I stepped back, I stepped in it! The runniest, ickiest pile of poo squished under my sandal.

Disgusted but laughing at my own dismay, I blurted out, “Sometimes you have to have a little sh*t with your roses!” I felt my mama speaking through me and I could feel her presence with us. She always added humor and optimism to any ‘crappy’ situation.

We ran to the ocean shore to wash my sandal and my foot, and as we approached we saw a bunch of little baby ducks! We would not have witnessed them if I hadn’t stepped in it. We then giggled and indulged ourselves with foot scrubs.

According to Bach’s Wild Rose Flower essence, wild rose encourages the positive potential for enthusiasm and a lively interest in life. Reigniting our passion for life, and enthusiasm for the world in general, work, and those we care about.

I definitely felt this, despite the rain and the poo, it was a magical day. After we parted, I visited a few sacred spots of mine and gathered some petals that are now infusing in oil for my Ageless cream!

There are over 10,000 species of Roses and they have a long history of healing, used to treat cold, flu, depression, grief, the immune system, digestive system, and used in skincare to name a few!

Thank you Rose for your beauty and magic, for more on Wild Rose medicine, see my Wild Rose Monograph post!!๐Ÿ’š๐ŸŒน

Spring and the Dandelion

Spring has Sprung! Slowly but surely I am shaking off the lingering cold of winter and my body is trying to warm up. Feeling a bit sluggish, I am glad I have a dandelion leaf and root tincture made to assist in detoxing leftover stale energy and heavy foods of last season. Spring is such a great time to cleanse away what is no longer serving us.

I know for many this little flower is a nuisance but to me, it is an ally. I look forward to their arrival every Spring. Did you know that dandelion (taraxacum officinale) is full of good stuff for us? You can use the root, leaf, bud, and flower! The entire plant is highly nutritious. The flowers are high in antioxidants and can be used in salads, fritters, and wine, just to name a few. The greens contain vitamins, antioxidants, minerals, including iron, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. They can be eaten raw or cooked. I like to make a dandelion pesto. The root is full of soluble fiber and can aid in digestion and help treat liver problems, and is delicious as a tea.

For more on dandelion, see my Dandelion Monograph

So, the next time you are thinking about mowing over them, pause and ask how you can benefit from its medicine. If you are wildcrafting them, make sure they are free from pesticides, 10ft from the roadside (where they are exposed to toxic fumes) and take only 1/3, and always ask permission.

Happy Spring! Happy Wildcrafting! Happy Healing!๐Ÿ’š

dandelion pic credit: Natalia Luchanko