Daisy Monograph

Common names: Common daisy, English daisy, Wild daisy, Bruisewort, Woundwort, Bairnwort

Latin name: Bellis perennis

Family name: Compositae (Asteraceae)

Genus: Carliquistia

Parts used: Flowers, Leaves, Root (less common)

Actions: Vulnerary, Anti-inflammatory, Astringent, Antioxidant, Expectorant, Cooling, Drying, Bitter

Constituents: Malic acid, acetic acid, oxalic acid, tartaric acid, L-ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), L-arbutin, resins, wax, inulin, mucilaginous substances, saponins, minerals, essential oils, and tannins.

Indications: Bruises, broken bones, muscle pain, wounds, rheumatism, upper respiratory infections, gastritis, stomach ache, headache, inflammation, diarrhea, bleeding, boils, common cold, and eczema. Because it is rich in antioxidants along with acids that firm the skin, daisy can be used to treat wrinkles and saggy skin. The L-arbutin in daisy can lighten the skin. It can also act as a vitamin supplement.

Preparation & Dosage: Young leaves can be eaten raw in salads, or cooked, though the leaves become increasingly astringent with age. Flower buds and petals can be eaten raw in sandwiches, soups, and salads. May be used in tea, infusion, or extract form. To make tea: Add 2 tsp of fresh daisies to 1 cup of boiled water. Infuse for 10 mins. For an infusion, add 1 Tb to 1 qt jar and steep 4 hrs to overnight. Strain off the herbs and drink the liquid. A strong decoction of the roots was used to treat scurvy. For skincare, Daisy can be infused in distilled water and used as a wash, or flower heads can be added directly to the bath to ease skin troubles. Daisy flowers can also be made into an infused oil and/or salve to treat skin, bruises, wounds, etc., Dosage: Tea and infusion up to 3 cups per day, Tincture/extract up to 20 drops, 3 x day.

Description: Low rosettes of small, oval, slightly hairy leaves with shallowly toothed edges, grows to 6-12 inches tall. White and yellow flower heads 2 1/2-5 centimeters, with hairy bracts under flower head, on short leafless stems. Fibrous rhizomes.

Habitat & Growing conditions: A perennial herbaceous plant that flowers from the earliest days of Spring till late Autumn and grows everywhere except Antarctica. Amazingly makes up almost 10% of all flowering plants on Earth! Full sun to partial shade. Grows wild and needs little care and maintenance. It may be propagated either by seed after the last frost or by division after flowering. Daisy is found mainly on moist, neutral to basic soils, in unimproved or improved grasslands kept short by grazing, mowing, or trampling. Also in disturbed habitats such as roadsides and waste ground. The flowers can be harvested from April to October.

Status: Considered a weed.

Cautions & considerations: Internally, it is best to use daisy with some supervision and support from an experienced herbalist. Do not use it internally during pregnancy or if one has digestive bleeding or irritation. Also, daisy flowers contain pollen and could trigger this allergy.

Magickal properties: Their magickal properties include love, friendship, divination, healing, and protection. Daisies are feminine in nature and resonate with Venus, the Sun, and the element of Water. The word daisy comes from “day’s eye” because she closes up at night and opens up during the day, like a long-lashed eye. Daisy symbolizes innocence, purity, and childhood. A long-loved divinatory practice with daisies, is the infamous, “he loves me, he loves me not” while tearing the petals. In Norse mythology, the daisy is a sacred flower to Freya, but they make wonderful offerings for any Goddess and can be made into wreaths to wear in your hair for Beltane or Midsummer.

Flower Essence: Daisy flower essence can be great for students, writers, and other creatives, as it can help organize a scattered mind, and it can instill calmness and feelings of safety, protection, and love. Daisy FE can help align heart, mind, and consciousness, and open honest communication with self and others.

Notes: Daisy has a long history, since (2200 BC!) of medicinal use. It’s been said that the ancient Egyptians grew daisies in their gardens and utilized them medicinally.

During the Roman Empire, the military doctors soaked bandages with daisy flower tincture to treat wounded soldiers. T

Gerard mentions the Daisy, under the name of ‘Bruisewort,’ as an unfailing remedy in ‘all kinds of paines and aches,’ besides curing fevers, inflammation of the liver and ‘alle the inwarde parts.’

In 1771 Dr. Hill said that an infusion of the leaves was ‘excellent against Hectic Fevers.’ The Daisy was an ingredient of an ointment much used in the fourteenth century for wounds, gout, and fevers.

Resources:

Pic credit (&other notes) from A Modern Herbal (Botanical.com)

Solidarity Apothecary (solidarityapothecary.org)

The Herbal Hub (theherbalhub.com)

The Wildlife Journal (https://nhpbs.org/)

Beverly Hills MD (beverlyhillsmd.com)

Wicca Now (wiccanow.com)

The Tree Frog Farm (treefrogfarm.com)

Aquarius Flower Remedies (aquariusflowerremedies.com)

Wikepedia and Witchipedia

My Mama, My Guide

With Mother’s day just past, I thought it would be a good time to present my mama, Cara, (meaning friend in Irish).
She was the first to introduce me to plants, using chamomile for my diaper rash, parsley packs for injuries, and peppermint to soothe my belly aches.
She loved nature and raised me close to Mother Earth.
She told me stories of my great grandmothers, one part Miqmaq and the other an incredible healer&witch.
When my dear mom passed, she took a piece of my heart and soul.
In exchange a part of her is within me eternally.
She has always been and still is my guide.💚🌹

The Delay…

180 Patience Quotes That Will Make You Tougher (And Wiser)

The word and feeling of delay is pretty familiar these days. The Pandemic has forced us to slow down and even stop our activity. Nevertheless, I want to apologize for the delay in posting and launching my BeYOUthentic herbal products.

Pandemic aside. I have had other issues that have made me slow down to process. If you follow my other blog Labeled Disabled, then you know I struggle with mental health. I have been working towards launching my own business for over a year with Vocational Rehab, if you want to know more about that journey, you can read my latest post there, Commitment&Consistency.

Meanwhile, I do have two social media pages up on Facebook and Instagram that I have managed to post weekly on. I launched my first product, Nourish Herbal Cream at a recent local fundraiser and received great feedback! I am very much looking forward to sharing it with you!

I hope you are all hanging in here during these challenging times.

Be patient. Be kind.

Thanks so much for being here💚

Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." -Ralph Waldo Emerson -  Ralph Waldo Emerson | Nature quotes, Patience, Inspirational quotes